China to Build New ECOWAS Headquarters in Abuja

China to Build New ECOWAS Headquarters in Abuja

The Chinese represent these construction projects as acts of good will, but not everyone is convinced. In January 2018, Le Monde, citing anonymous African Union sources, reported that data from AU computers had been transferred nightly to Shanghai servers from 2012 to 2017. Le Monde also reported the discovery of numerous bugs. Beijing strongly denies the allegations, and the African Union has chosen to disregard them, after initially simply maintaining that it has no secrets to spy on. Allegations of spying on the AU are not new or confined to China; there is an earlier Le Monde report that British intelligence had been targeting African Union officials.

New From CBO: Trillion-Dollar Deficits Will Return In Two Years

New From CBO: Trillion-Dollar Deficits Will Return In Two Years

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) just released its latest baseline-projections – the first since last June and the first to incorporate the recent tax cuts and spending increases. CBO's baseline confirms our recent projections that permanent trillion-dollar deficits will soon return and that debt will continue to grow rapidly as a share of the economy.

Facial Recognition In China Is Big Business As Local Governments Boost Surveillance

Facial Recognition In China Is Big Business As Local Governments Boost Surveillance

China's State Council, its central government, has laid out goals to build an artificial intelligence industry worth nearly $150 billion within the next two years, much of it to enhance domestic security.

"The government's using this technology to catch people who are considered threats to social stability," says Ji. "Are they using it to catch thieves? Yes. But it's mostly used to maintain stability."

Philadephia's New DA Wants Prosecutors To Talk Cost Of Incarceration While In Court

Philadephia's New DA Wants Prosecutors To Talk Cost Of Incarceration While In Court

In Philadelphia, the new progressive district attorney has launched an experiment. He's asking his prosecutors to raise another factor with judges: the cost of incarceration. The move has ignited a debate about whether the pricetag of punishment belongs in courtrooms.

Could enemies sabotage undersea cables linking the world?

Could enemies sabotage undersea cables linking the world?

It’s not Moscow’s warfighting ships and submarines that are making NATO and U.S. officials uneasy. It’s Russia’s Main Directorate of Deep Sea Research, whose specialized surface ships, submarines, underwater drones and mini subs conduct reconnaissance, underwater salvage and other work.

Who Would Want to Be the Next President?

Who Would Want to Be the Next President?

The next president will come into office in early 2021, and the nation will be facing the most dangerous budget situation in peacetime history. If policies are not changed between now and then, he or she will be looking at 10-year deficits of $20 trillion or more. If you think Washington is a dysfunctional mess now with members at each other’s throats, I am guessing that today is a picnic compared to federal policymaking down the road.

China's premier pledges market opening in bid to avert U.S. trade war

China's premier pledges market opening in bid to avert U.S. trade war

Premier Li Keqiang said on Monday China and the United States should maintain negotiations and he reiterated pledges to ease access for American businesses, as China scrambles to avert a trade war.

Where Does the Higher Spending in the Omnibus Go?

Where Does the Higher Spending in the Omnibus Go?

Policymakers recently announced an omnibus appropriations bill to fund the government for the remaining six months of Fiscal Year 2018. The bill funds ordinary defense and non-defense spending at $1.208 trillion, which is $143 billion higher than the levels set by the Budget Control Act (BCA) sequester-level caps and $52 billion above the original BCA caps. Not surprisingly, the deal also relies on a number of gimmicks and workarounds to spend in excess of these caps – the details of which we’ll discuss in future analysis.

Big Spenders Dominate

Big Spenders Dominate

You could say that the (nominally spendthrift) Democrats took the (nominally frugal) Republicans to the cleaners. But the real problem is that the great majority of members in both parties love federal spending. They think it unambiguously helps people; they are oblivious to constitutional federalism; they are willing to load more debt onto young people; and they have no idea about the negative consequences of government spending, such as the crowding out of private-sector activities.

Congress rushes to pass funding bill before Friday deadline

Congress rushes to pass funding bill before Friday deadline

The U.S. Congress raced on Thursday to approve a massive spending bill and send it to President Donald Trump before a midnight Friday government shutdown deadline, in a move that would significantly boost defense and non-military funding through Sept. 30, but also severely contribute to annual deficits.

As China Invests in Ukraine, Russia Stands to Gain

As China Invests in Ukraine, Russia Stands to Gain

A top Chinese official visited Kyiv this week to announce a host of new infrastructure projects and investments in Ukraine, underscoring a burgeoning economic relationship between the two countries that could nudge Kyiv away from the West—a scenario that would ultimately benefit Moscow, some say.

Who Owns The Digital Information About You?

Who Owns The Digital Information About You?

Legal analysts claim that Carpenter v. United States, argued earlier this week before the Supreme Court, is one of the most important Fourth Amendment cases in a decade. The Court has been asked to review whether the government could rely on cell phone location data obtained without a warrant to prosecute a person for armed robbery.

In polarized era, fewer Americans hold a mix of conservative and liberal views

In polarized era, fewer Americans hold a mix of conservative and liberal views

Overall, 32% of Americans now take a roughly equal number of conservative and liberal positions on a scale based on 10 questions asked together in seven surveys since 1994. As recently as 2015, 38% had this mix of values – and 49% did so in 1994 and 2004.

5 facts about the national debt

5 facts about the national debt

Congress and the White House have until the end of September to raise the national debt limit before the federal government is faced with the prospect of either not paying its bondholders on time or deferring other bills. Here’s a primer on the U.S. national debt, the debt limit and interest payments on the nation’s credit line:

Social Security's 82nd Birthday

Social Security's 82nd Birthday

Today, the Social Security program turns 82 years old. Social Security helps millions of Americans, and the program has a lot to celebrate.

But the best birthday present policymakers could give is a comprehensive plan that ensures it will last to provide future generations with retirement security and avoid abrupt benefit cuts.

Millennials will soon be the largest voting bloc in America

Millennials will soon be the largest voting bloc in America

It turns out that the 2016 election was historic in more ways than one. A report released today by the Pew Research Center shows that for the first time ever, Millennial and Gen X voters outnumbered Boomers and older voters, 69.6 million to 67.9 million. This gap will only widen in future elections: death and infirmity will steadily thin the ranks of older cohorts while rising turnout rates among younger voters will continue to swell their share of the electorate. In addition, naturalization will steadily increase the number of Millennials born outside the United States who are on track to attain citizenship.

Problems with the ‘committee tax’ in Congress

Problems with the ‘committee tax’ in Congress

Chairmen of the U.S. House’s most-coveted committees—the so-called “A” committees that include Appropriations, Energy and Commerce, Financial Services, Rules, and Ways and Means—are each expected to raise at least $1.2 million for the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) to satisfy the “party dues” slapped on members by GOP leaders. Less-coveted gavels on “B” committees like the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee come with a price tag of $875,000 for House Republicans.

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